Tales of software craftsmanship

Tales of software craftsmanship

KDE accepted for Google Summer of Code 2013

Google Summer of Code 2013

I’m happy to announce that KDE has been accepted as a mentoring organization in Google Summer of Code 2013. This is our 9th consecutive year. Congrats to all accepted organizations, and a big thanks to everyone who helped to make this happen for KDE!

This year KDE will also participate in the Free and Open Source Outreach Program for Women, an internship opportunity running almost simultaneously with Google Summer of Code, from June to September. Please note that while the Outreach Program for Women shares many goals and methods with Google Summer of Code, the two programs are not related. Unlike Google Summer of Code, the Outreach Program for Women also allows non-coding contributions. For more information about applying, see KDE’s Outreach Program for Women wiki page.

KDE will also be hosting Season of KDE 2013, with more information to come in the following weeks. Season of KDE is expected to start later in the summer, around the Google Summer of Code midterm.

Students. Now that you have a list of accepted organizations, it’s time to start working on your proposal. The KDE community maintains an ideas page which is an excellent starting point, and don’t forget to check our student guidelines. Also, last year I published an article with some tips on how to structure your proposal, you might find it useful.

You can come up with your own idea or base your proposal on something from the ideas page, but either way it’s very important that you get feedback from the team you wish to work with well before the submissions deadline. If you have general questions about getting involved with KDE as a Google Summer of Code student you’re welcome to ask on our IRC channel #kde-soc on Freenode, or join the mailing list kde-soc@kde.org. For questions about a specific idea please contact the relevant team (subproject) directly.

Finally, make sure to keep an eye on the official Google Summer of Code timeline – those deadlines are always closer than they seem 😉

Mentors. Now that we know that KDE has been accepted, it’s time to get ready to mentor some students. If you wish to be a mentor your next steps should be:

  1. subscribe to kde-soc-mentor@kde.org,
  2. sign up on http://www.google-melange.com and apply as a mentor for KDE,
  3. contact one of the admins to approve your requests.

For questions you can reach the admin team in #kde-soc on Freenode or at kde-soc-mentor-owner@kde.org.

And most importantly, in the following weeks you’ll be contacted by prospective students with questions and feedback requests for their proposals. It might take a bit of time and you might get questions with very obvious answers. Please be patient and keep an eye on the timeline 😉



  • Reply Richard |

    Nice to see that KDE is accepted for GSoC, congrats!

    But may I ask, does these GSoC projects always have to be something “new & fancy”, or is it also allowed to fix things?
    Because I would like to promote the Extra Mile Initiative:
    The idea of Extra Mile Initiative is to fix bugs with a rather easy fix, but which have a rather big impact on the look & feel (thus the overall perception) of the KDE SC.
    However, unfortunately there is hardly any work done (https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=extramile).

    IMHO these EMB would be good for students, because they would get an easy introduction/overview into various KDE components, w/o the need to dig to deep into one single component (hopefully) and at the end of it, there would a direct product/visible outcome for the students – and the users.

    So what do you think?
    If it complies with GSoC guidelines, I would like to see it in the Ideas page and also on this blog post. :-)

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